Abstract Art Lovers

How I Look At The Abstract Art
I pride in the feeling and reactions of my clients and viewers to my creations. I feel blessed in many ways than words can express. The challenge sometimes is getting the composition right, or balancing the elements of color, lines and shapes while maintaining a dynamic tension and massage beneath.

Keywords:
abstract art,black art,modern art,abstract,african art,canvas art,painting,modernism,modern african art

Article Body:
I have always loved bright colors and movement, like dancing its healing, relaxing fulfilling and challenging as well. The bottom line is the feeling and message that I want to convey through the medium. When I paint, every attempt is to capture the feel of warmth, passion, joy and bliss in none objective or figurative composition. I enjoy experimentation of different media and subjects.

My subject varies based on my emotion and statement but my love for colors is constant. In spite of this, viewers see different forms or figures in my abstract expressions. The good thing about these expressions is the freedom of the viewers to see and appreciate the forms in their mind’s eyes, like face painting in the eye of the viewer. Its also important to mention that “Uli” which is my traditional art style has played a major role in my age long career. The symbols and forms of this art style are reflected in my cubism, abstract images, abstract relief sculpture, seascape, drawing, pastels and watercolor painting.

People see different forms or images in abstract art, the depth of what you actually see when you look at the paintings is partly based on individual exposure and understanding of art forms, color, shapes, line and texture; which are the physical elements that combine to make up the artworks.

A selection of different dark hues, shapes and forms may give various impressions to different minds; light, airy images as mystical; balanced, temperate forms as peaceful. Uli organic forms and shape are symbolical such as colors and forms have meaning in and of themselves. It is a simple truth that you can’t give what you don’t have. I am a believer and my work time is also a meditation time, which can go either way depending on the spiritual consciousness of the creative mind.

To me, my work section is an intimate moment between I, canvas and colors. At this creative moment there is a spiritual impartation from the artist to the Art. Hence the emotional reaction to these elements even if they create no recognizable object for us to hang onto.

I enjoy the inclusion and deletion of space. The handling of space or the
illusion of space is another powerful element in the artist’s mind. If you are drawn into a yard of three-dimensional space stretching beyond the framework of the painting to sculpture, you are not alone. The impression of depth, perspective, airiness, solidity, textures and other spatial relations are created and controlled to achieve a desired goal.
The overall composition or design of my painting or sculpture is created to guide the viewer’s eyes to understanding and appreciation of the images.

I must admit, most of my figurative compositions is a celebration of womanhood, which I am very proud to be part of for they are the seats of wisdom and knowledge.

I pride in the feeling and reactions of my clients and viewers to my creations. I feel blessed in many ways than words can express. The challenge sometimes is getting the composition right, or balancing the elements of color, lines and shapes while maintaining a dynamic tension and massage beneath.

Energy is the life force that is present in all good art. This is not something that is easily defined. The life force of every work I do is the same, but different energy and different statements. It is this peculiar energy that makes my works speak to you, and makes them unique, original and identifiable to me. This energy is created out of experience and self-awareness, materials and tools, but the end is more than the means in the same sense that a musical composition is so much more than a collection of notes.

You are welcome into my world of abstract wall art or modern art, relax and let your eye leisurely wander over the collection of verities of art forms and styles. Let your heart and mind react to my colors, shapes, figures and textures. Come and spoil yourself a little in the illusion of vibrant spaces, the movement of lines and the mood of blissful atmosphere.
Come, come up close and explore the intricacies of brushstrokes, spatula- strokes, paint thickness, textures and compositional details. Enjoy how the parts are woven together to form the whole.

Take your time. My artwork cannot be understood and appreciated in a ten second glance. Allow my art to grow on you, becoming more interesting and more enjoyable to look at as you live with it.

How I Look At The Abstract Art
I pride in the feeling and reactions of my clients and viewers to my creations. I feel blessed in many ways than words can express. The challenge sometimes is getting the composition right, or balancing the elements of color, lines and shapes while maintaining a dynamic tension and massage beneath.

I have always loved bright colors and movement, like dancing its healing, relaxing fulfilling and challenging as well. The bottom line is the feeling and message that I want to convey through the medium. When I paint, every attempt is to capture the feel of warmth, passion, joy and bliss in none objective or figurative composition. I enjoy experimentation of different media and subjects.

My subject varies based on my emotion and statement but my love for colors is constant. In spite of this, viewers see different forms or figures in my abstract expressions. The good thing about these expressions is the freedom of the viewers to see and appreciate the forms in their mind’s eyes, like face painting in the eye of the viewer. Its also important to mention that “Uli” which is my traditional art style has played a major role in my age long career. The symbols and forms of this art style are reflected in my cubism, abstract images, abstract relief sculpture, seascape, drawing, pastels and watercolor painting.

People see different forms or images in abstract art, the depth of what you actually see when you look at the paintings is partly based on individual exposure and understanding of art forms, color, shapes, line and texture; which are the physical elements that combine to make up the artworks.

A selection of different dark hues, shapes and forms may give various impressions to different minds; light, airy images as mystical; balanced, temperate forms as peaceful. Uli organic forms and shape are symbolical such as colors and forms have meaning in and of themselves. It is a simple truth that you can’t give what you don’t have. I am a believer and my work time is also a meditation time, which can go either way depending on the spiritual consciousness of the creative mind.

To me, my work section is an intimate moment between I, canvas and colors. At this creative moment there is a spiritual impartation from the artist to the Art. Hence the emotional reaction to these elements even if they create no recognizable object for us to hang onto.

I enjoy the inclusion and deletion of space. The handling of space or the
illusion of space is another powerful element in the artist’s mind. If you are drawn into a yard of three-dimensional space stretching beyond the framework of the painting to sculpture, you are not alone. The impression of depth, perspective, airiness, solidity, textures and other spatial relations are created and controlled to achieve a desired goal.
The overall composition or design of my painting or sculpture is created to guide the viewer’s eyes to understanding and appreciation of the images.

I must admit, most of my figurative compositions is a celebration of womanhood, which I am very proud to be part of for they are the seats of wisdom and knowledge.

I pride in the feeling and reactions of my clients and viewers to my creations. I feel blessed in many ways than words can express. The challenge sometimes is getting the composition right, or balancing the elements of color, lines and shapes while maintaining a dynamic tension and massage beneath.

Energy is the life force that is present in all good art. This is not something that is easily defined. The life force of every work I do is the same, but different energy and different statements. It is this peculiar energy that makes my works speak to you, and makes them unique, original and identifiable to me. This energy is created out of experience and self-awareness, materials and tools, but the end is more than the means in the same sense that a musical composition is so much more than a collection of notes.

You are welcome into my world of abstract wall art or modern art, relax and let your eye leisurely wander over the collection of verities of art forms and styles. Let your heart and mind react to my colors, shapes, figures and textures. Come and spoil yourself a little in the illusion of vibrant spaces, the movement of lines and the mood of blissful atmosphere.

Come, come up close and explore the intricacies of brushstrokes, spatula- strokes, paint thickness, textures and compositional details. Enjoy how the parts are woven together to form the whole.

Take your time. My artwork cannot be understood and appreciated in a ten second glance. Allow my art to grow on you, becoming more interesting and more enjoyable to look at as you live with it.

Rajinder S Bedi, President,
Abstract Art Lovers, A Facebook Group,
All Indian Artists In The World, A Facebook Group,

Quick Guide To Prepare Your Artwork For Printing
The following is a quick guide on what to think about when preparing your artwork for printing.

It is important you follow these guidelines as any errors made are likely to cause a delay or cause unnecessary stress should the final print quality be sub-standard.

7 Ways To Ensure Your Artwork Is Print Ready
1. Check your files
Check your artwork for spelling mistakes, grammar and ensure all images used are high resolution. Double check to make sure as any errors found will delay the turnaround of your product.

2. Bleed
Bleed is the extra bit of the design page which you design on, as normal, with the knowledge that it will be trimmed off the finished flyer. Any images on your artwork should bleed off the page, and essential text should be away from the trim edge by a good few mm’s. We use a 2mm bleed area on each edge.

3. Text
Keep essential text away from the edge of the flyer, by about 8-10mm for best results.

4. Print Resolution
Ensure your artworks resolution is at least 300dpi. The higher the resolution the better.

5. File Formats
If you are using un-common fonts, ensure you supply your artwork as a flattened jpeg or tiff. This will ensure there will be no font problems when your artwork is checked. The most commonly accepted program formats are Quark, Illustrator, Photoshop, Corel Draw, Corel Paint, Freehand, InDesign and Paint Shop Pro. Vector files such as .eps and pdf’s are becoming more common and ensure a better end product.

6. Colours
Unless you have a calibrated monitor your artwork is likely to have slightly different colours when printed. Ensure your colour choices are correct before sending to print.

7. A Final Check
Before sending to your printer, have one more final check that everything is as expected.

WARNING
There are two things you should consider when designing your flyers:

Due to the quick turn around of our flyers, they are trimmed down not long after they are printed, in most circumstances we try to give a printed sheet 8 hours to dry completely, this isn’t always the case. This is noticeable when one side of the flyer is left white, and the other side bleeds rich colour to the trim edge. This will cause slight powdering of the rich ink over, on to the white side. In this circumstance we recommend the use of borders.

Borders on the edge of a flyer, can sometimes give the flyer a classic look. But make sure the borders are a good few mm in from the trim edge, because of the way we print flyers (up to 32 at a time) and the speed at which we turn them round (from payment, to your door) these borders may not be an accurate trim to the exact 10th of a mm. This is why we ask for a 2mm bleed. The cutting blade could go either way. We cannot be held responsible for imperfect results if these borders are slightly uneven.

Rajinder S Bedi, President,
Abstract Art Lovers, A Facebook Group,
All Indian Artists In The World, A Facebook Group,

Quickie Art Primer
I present a Quickie Art Primer to understand the difference between various types of Art Prints. It is more important for buyer to understand the difference. But this knowledge is equally useful for the Artist to make better use of his prints. Let us learn the difference between Multiple Originals, Original Prints and Reproductive Prints and become an informed art buyer.

Singular Original Works of Art
Most collectors understand and feel knowledgeable when speaking of singular original works of art — paintings, pencil drawings, pen and inks, acrylics, watercolors, etc. Here the artist has created one work of art with his own hand. The surface might be paper or canvas or even masonite.

Multiple Originals
A bit more complicated are Multiple Originals…commonly called Original Prints. Traditionally, the artist creates a master image for the purpose of making a small number of prints that he will sign and number. The master image might be created upon a block, stone, plate or screen — any of which assists in conveying the image to the print surface. See chart detailing the differences in woodcuts, etchings, lithographs, and serigraphs or silkscreens.

Vehicles To Produce Original Prints
The blocks, plates, stones and screens cannot be considered originals. They are just vehicles to produce Original Prints.

Reproductive Prints
Next there are Reproductive Prints. The artist has produced an original work…and photograph technology and automated printing equipment create reproductions. Fine art print reproductions are usually signed and numbered in limited editions and care must be exercised so they remain in mint condition in order to preserve their value. Click the link above the view a diagram.

Advanced Process
A similar, but much advanced process, creates giclées — the state of the art prints now taking the art collecting world to a whole new level.

Rajinder S Bedi, President,
Abstract Art Lovers
All Indian Artists In The World
Facebook Groups.

A child’s first scribbling is something which it tries to express if you give a pencil in his hand. Drawing is relatively very simple and an easy skill and is something with which you can have great fun. It is also relatively not a very expensive hobby and can start with paper and a pencil. It can go on till acquiring costly pen and tablets – a computer hardware through which you can draw on your computer. It is very costly; however the precision for perfection is very high.

Unlike earlier days, getting information on drawing and sketching is very easy and inexpensive. You can search information on Google and get various sites which teach drawing. Also, nowadays this art form is liked by many youngsters. Like all other art forms, with constant and systematic practice one can become a great artist.

Listed below are few drawing tips which can help anyone improve their skill and become an artist. Reading and practicing these in your daily routine will improve your skill.

Light
1. If you are drawing and you are right handed person, ensure that the light is from your left side. This will prevent your hand shadow falling on your paper.

Control Of Line
2. First step when you practice drawing – you should practice drawing line, straight line, curved line, scribbled lines, and your hand should obey the command of your thoughts and visions. You should control your hand and you should be able to bring out what you want.

Step By Step
3. You should further develop drawing circles, oval shapes, crossed lines and bold and thick lines. Just like how a baby develops from crawling stage to walking stage, your art should also develop step by step.

Strong Foundation
4. These lines and curves are like pillars to a building. The foundation should be strong enough to have a good building; similarly these initial small lines and curves will go a long way in your career. You should also start controlling the stress on your pencil. You should be able to bring the correct darkness and thickness in the lines what you draw.

Practice, Practice, Practice
5. Initially you will not be able to draw a circle or an oval shape correctly, nevertheless don’t get discouraged. You should practice and practice until you get perfection. You should also keep all your drawings carefully from the start to know how you are improving. You could also date your sketches and preserve it for the future.

Concentrate On Weak Areas
6. You should concentrate in the area where you feel you are weak. If you are not able to shade properly then learn more to do that. You can try out your own style of shading. Build your own individuality, never copy from another artist.

Use Good Quality Materials
7. Last but not the least, use good quality materials. 4B and 6B pencils and good chart paper or note book with good quality paper should be sufficient to start with. Quality definitely matters hence never compromise on quality.

Rajinder S Bedi, President,
Abstract Art Lovers
All Indian Artists In The World
Facebook Groups.

There are several things that you might not have thought of, that add extra value to your artwork and can make it worth more money when you come to sell it. I’m not talking here about reworking pieces you feel haven’t come up to scratch.

How To Add Value To Your Art Work?
Yes, it is sometimes possible to rescue a less than perfect water-colour by using a pen and ink technique, and you can paint right over parts of an oil or acrylic painting to in effect completely rework the area, but here I am talking about techniques that don’t involve changing your artwork in any way.

Mount & Frame
Sometimes you only need to put a cardboard mount around a painting to bring it out of the doldrums, and there is no doubt that the right mount and frame can do wonders for a slightly mediocre piece of art. For a sculpture, or a piece of ceramics, the right stand and appropriate lighting can make a big difference to the way it displays, but after you’ve made sure that your artwork is being displayed to its best what else can you do to add to its worth?

Sign It
The first and most important thing you should do is make sure that your artwork is signed legibly. It’s surprising how many people forget to sign their art, but it makes a big difference to the buyer. A signed piece of work is worth more money than an unsigned one, and it doesn’t matter whether you sign it on the front, at the top or bottom, within the composition, or even on the back, just as long as you sign it. If you have an illegible signature spare a thought for future generations trying to make out what it says and wondering whether they have a piece by a famous artist. The first thing almost everybody wants to know about any piece of artwork is who made it, what’s the name of the artist. If it’s unsigned it’s almost as though you didn’t rate it enough to put your name to it, and if you don’t rate it no one else will either.

Give A Title
The second thing you need to do, in order to add value to your art, is to give it a title. Now, some people don’t like titling their work because they feel that it pigeonholes it and in some way restricts the viewer to seeing it within a particular set of conceptual boundaries, so if you are one of these people then you should really consider calling it ‘Untitled’. Even with the title that says ‘Untitled’, a piece of work is worth more money than if it doesn’t have a title at all. Artwork without a title leaves the potential buyer wondering whether perhaps it had a title once that has been lost, it leaves the buyer with an unanswered question and means they are less likely to buy it and more likely to move on to another piece instead.

Explain
Along with the title, your artwork would benefit from a short explanation about it. The more a buyer knows about a piece of work the more likely they are to buy it. If you think about it by putting yourself in the buyer’s shoes for a moment, if you’re faced with two pieces of work which are similar and you like them both, but you know nothing about one and quite a lot about the other, which one would you buy? Of course you would be much more likely to buy a piece of artwork that had information about it, because you’d feel more involved with it, you’d understand something about its history and about the person that created it, so it has more meaning for you and you feel a connection with it right from the start.

Give Its Background
The short explanation or description about your piece of art can say whatever you want it to, there are no rules, but it’s useful to tell people either what it’s about or what it means to you. One thing you don’t want to do is tell people what it should mean to them, the viewer or buyer of your artwork wants to be able to decide for themselves what the piece means to them, and it doesn’t matter if it’s something entirely different from what it means to you.

Why & How
Most people buying artwork do like to know what it was you meant as you created it, or what drove you to create the piece the way it is. This can mean telling them something about you, your thought processes as you were beginning and working through the piece, or maybe what was going on in your life at the time you were creating this piece of art. You might decide to tell them about something you’d seen or heard that affected you in a particular way and that prompted you to express something specific with this particular medium. You might be telling them that this particular piece of art is one of a collection from your ‘blue period’, or your ‘impressionistic landscape period’, or whatever.

Medium, Technique Used & Time Taken
If you don’t really want to give this information away, then perhaps instead you could describe the medium you have used, the particular techniques you’ve employed in using this medium and even the length of time it took you to create the piece. Really any information you give about the piece is better than no information at all, and it doesn’t matter whether the potential buyer understands your concept or not, it still makes it more attractive to them to know that there was an intention of one sort or another behind the original idea.

Rajinder S Bedi, President,
Abstract Art Lovers
All Indian Artists In The World
Facebook Groups.

All Abstract Art Lovers Are Welcome !!

You are invited to participate and contribute your best on the subject.

This Blog has been set up specifically for the newly established Facebook Group: ABSTRACT ART LOVERS.

There are several hundred Art Groups on the Facebook. But this is the only Group which is formed by the abstract art lovers fraternity. It is not dedicated to a particular artist, gallery or trend. It will promote all the abstract art and the artists of abstract art.

Rajinder S Bedi
President,
Abstract Art Lovers
A Facebook Group,

What is abstract art? The latest definition is reproduced below as extracted from Wikipedia:

Abstract art
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Kazimir Malevich, Black square 1915

Abstract art uses a visual language of form, color and line to create a composition which exists independently of visual references to the world.[1] Western art had been, from the Renaissance up to the middle of the 19th century, underpinned by the logic of perspective and an attempt to reproduce an illusion of visible reality. The arts of cultures other than the European had become accessible and showed alternative ways to the artist, of describing visual experience (see:Paul Gauguin, Vincent Van Gogh). By the end of the 19th century many artists felt a need to create a ‘new kind of art’ which would encompass the fundamental changes taking place in technology, science and philosophy. The sources from which individual artists drew their theoretical arguments were diverse, and reflected the social and intellectual turmoil in all areas of Western culture at that time.[2]

Rajinder S Bedi, President,
Abstract Art Lovers
All Indian Artists In The World
Facebook Groups.


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  • Limousine Service in Frisco: You are so awesome! I don't believe I have read through something like this before. So nice to discover someone with some original thoughts on this su
  • Vernita: Hello just wanted to give you a brief heads up and let you know a few of the pictures aren't loading correctly. I'm not sure why but I think i
  • Lee: I'm not entirely sure about the material quality being all that necessary. A child first learns to draw with Crayola crayons, and those have been see

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